lastwords

cur

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English German
cur subst. die Töle f
cur subst. der Köter m
curability subst. die Heilbarkeit f
curable adj. heilbar
  kurabel
curableness subst. die Heilbarkeit f
curably adv. heilbar
curare subst. die Curare f
curare subst. das Kurare n
curari subst. das Curare n
  das Kurare n
curariform adj. curareähnlich
curarine subst. das Curarin n
  das Kurarin n
curarization subst. die Kurarisierung f
to curarize vt. kurarisieren
curate subst. der Hilfsprediger m
  der Pfarrhelfer m
  der Vikar m
curative adj. heilend
accesses today: 51 289.966 words in the dictionary accesses total: 46.822

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Cur aus Wikipedia. Zum Beitrag

Cur - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia a.new,#quickbar a.new{color:#ba0000} /* cache key: enwiki:resourceloader:filter:minify-css:5:f2a9127573a22335c2a9102b208c73e7 */ Cur From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: , For the Swiss city and canton named Cur in German, see Chur. For the filename extension ".cur", see ICO (icon image file format). For other uses, see CUR (disambiguation). A young Mountain Cur. Cur as slang refers to a type of random-bred, or mixed-breed dog. This article deals with Cur as an actual breed.

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Etymology

The derivation of the word "cur" dates from the 13th century. It is thought to be short for the Middle English "curdogge", which derives from the word "curren", meaning "to growl". According to the Dictionary of True Etymologies the original root of the word may be If so, the word may be onomatopoeic. Cur and the word "mutt" mean almost the same thing. A mutt is also a mixed breed or stray dog. Another plausible explanation is that the word may be a derivation of "cu", the Gaelic word for "hound". A group of curs may be referred to as a cowardice.

Early usage

Historically, the words cur and feist were used in England to refer to small hunting dogs, where "feists" were the smaller dogs and "curs" were 30 lbs or larger. The Elizabethans may have used the word "cur" to denote "terrier". The word cur appears to be colloquial in nature. In 1790, Thomas Bewick wrote: The Cur Dog is a trusty and useful servant to the farmer and grazier; and, although it is not taken notice of by naturalists as a distinct race, yet it is now so generally used, especially in the North of England, and such great attention is paid in breeding it, that we cannot help considering it as a permanent kind. They are chiefly employed in driving cattle; in which way they are extremely useful. They are larger, stronger, and fiercer than the Shepherd's Dog; and their hair is smoother and shorter. They are mostly black and white colour. Their ears are half-pricked; and many of them are whelped with short tails, which seem as if they had been cut: These are called Self-tailed Dogs. They bite very keenly; and as they always make their attack at the heels, the cattle have no defence against them: In this way they are more than a match for a Bull, which they quickly compel to run. Their sagacity is uncommonly great. They know their master's fields, and are singularly attentive to the cattle that are in them: A good Dog watches, goes his rounds; and, if any strange cattle should happen to appear amongst the herd, although unbidden, he quickly flies at them, and with keen bites obliges them to depart. Cur also appeared in the Scottish periodical, Blackwood's Magazine in ... mehr

Cur aus Wikipedia. Zum Beitrag


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