lastwords

brittle

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English German
brittle adj. bröckelig
  brüchig
  glashart
  mürbe
  spröd
  zerbrechlich
brittle subst. der Krokant m
brittle bones   Osteogenesis imperfecta  
brittle bones subst.   die Osteoporose f
brittle failure subst.   der Sprödbruch m
brittle mica subst.   der Sprödglimmer m
brittle point subst.   der Kältesprödigkeitspunkt m
  der Sprödigkeitspunkt m
brittle-point temperature subst.   die Kältebruchtemperatur f
brittleness subst. die Brüchigkeit f
  die Sprödigkeit f
  die Zerbrechlichkeit f
brittleness temperature subst.   die Kältebruchtemperatur f
  die Sprödbruchtemperatur f
  die Versprödungstemperatur f
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Brittle aus Wikipedia. Zum Beitrag

Brittleness - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia a.new,#quickbar a.new{color:#ba0000} /* cache key: enwiki:resourceloader:filter:minify-css:5:f2a9127573a22335c2a9102b208c73e7 */ Brittleness From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Redirected from Brittle) Jump to: , "Brittle" redirects here. For other uses, see Brittle (disambiguation). Brittle fracture in glass Brittle fracture in cast iron tensile testpieces Graph comparing stress-strain curves for brittle and ductile materials A material is brittle if, when subjected to stress, it breaks without significant deformation (strain). Brittle materials absorb relatively little energy prior to fracture, even those of high strength. Breaking is often accompanied by a snapping sound. Brittle materials include most ceramics and glasses (which do not deform plastically) and some polymers, such as PMMA and polystyrene. Many steels become brittle at low temperatures (see ductile-brittle transition temperature), depending on their composition and processing. When used in materials science, it is generally applied to materials that fail in tension rather than shear, or when there is little or no evidence of plastic deformation before failure. When a material has reached the limit of its strength, it usually has the option of either deformation or fracture. A naturally malleable metal can be made stronger by impeding the mechanisms of plastic deformation (reducing grain size, dispersion strengthening, work hardening, etc.), but if this is taken to an extreme, fracture becomes the more likely outcome, and the material can become brittle. Improving material toughness is therefore a balancing act.

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Toughening

This principle generalizes to other classes of material. Naturally brittle materials, such as glass, are not difficult to toughen effectively. Most such... mehr

Brittle aus Wikipedia. Zum Beitrag


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